Friday, April 4, 2014

March 2014

"One thousand jobs"
[Thunder crash!]
"Two thousand jobs"
[Mail slot slowly opens]
"Three thousand jobs"
[Loan statement drops on floor]
"Four thousand jobs"
[Another thunder crash]
"Ah! Ah! Ah!"

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.t17.htm

Not seasonally adjustedMarch20131,129,000
January20141,129,200
February20141,129,300
March20141,133,0004,000
Seasonally adjustedMarch20131,133,400
January20141,136,700
February20141,136,700
March20141,137,4004,000
Change from Feb-14 to
Mar-14
700

Sunday, March 16, 2014

February 2014

February was unremarkable. The main thing of note, lately, is US Snooze released its 2015 ranking. Well, it's of note to the type who can work himself into a rabid lather over where Brooklyn landed. There are enough of these to keep Bob Morse gainfully employed forever. Unlike, say, lawyers.

The Wall Street Journal did a good summary, IMNSHO. Main takeaway is nothing succeeds like success.

The durability of the top 10: Four decades ago — years before U.S. News started publishing its law school rankings — sociologist Peter M. Blau published the results of a survey of law school deans on which schools they thought were the best. As Duke law professor Richard Schmalbeck noted in a paper, the legal education hierarchy has changed very little. The 1974 survey’s top nine schools all show up in the top 10 of the latest U.S. News rankings.

PRESTTTIGE!

I continue to encourage the terminally credulous to go to law school so they can get what they have coming.

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.t17.htm

Not seasonally adjustedFebruary20131,123,100
December20131,138,800
January20141,129,500
February20141,128,9005,800
Seasonally adjustedFebruary20131,129,900
December20131,135,100
January20141,136,600
February20141,136,3006,400
Change from Jan-14 to
Feb-14
-300

Sunday, March 2, 2014

January 2014

You can tell I take this blog seriously when I forget that I hadn't posted January. Fixed.

During its relatively brief existence, the world has passed it by. As Nando reports, anti-law school sentiment is now mainstream. Want to know what otherworldly, self-serving tripe your favorite law school dean is dishing out? Read CNN. Nice photo of the JMLS building in the article, BTW. I can only imagine how many lemmings have stood on the Chicago 'L' platform by the school, seen the sign, and thrown their life away.

Back to the matter at hand. Year-over-year industry growth was about 7,000 positions. In another impressive statistic, JMLS accepted 64% of applicants for the class of 2017. It's hard to consider law a profession when the criterion for a legal education is being able to fog a mirror.

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.t17.htm

Not seasonally adjustedJanuary20131,122,800
November20131,137,700
December20131,138,900
January20141,129,7006,900
Seasonally adjustedJanuary20131,130,200
November20131,135,600
December20131,135,200
January20141,137,2007,000
Change from Dec-13 to
Jan-14
2,000

Saturday, January 11, 2014

TTThat was the year TTThat was (2013 edition)

The legal industry grew shrank 1,000 positions in 2013, accompanied by the sound of one hand clapping. Three-year growth was about 13,000.

It's been a tough slog, but even the densest individuals acknowledge reality and now aim for JD-Advantage™ slots instead of attorney positions. Let me explain something: I deal with legal experts all day long, both at work and elsewhere, and only one has a JD, the company lawyer. Our HR person is well acquainted with employment law and overtime and knows enough Obamacare to keep the company out of trouble. My condo management agent is also a licensed real estate agent and is familiar with liens, insurance, mortgages, foreclosure, and, of course, association law. Our bookkeepers know state and local eviction procedures and requirements and sometimes testify in court. Our techs have EPA cards. Basically, everyone picks up applicable law on the job through both formal and informal training. Some study to become licensed or certified in their discipline. If they don't know something, they know how to reach out, and that wouldn't necessarily be to a lawyer.

I don't believe a JD would benefit any of them, especially after taking financial and opportunity cost into account. It's a needless distraction from a career. In short, there is no JD Advantage, and that's with a GOOD outcome. A bad outcome, which is what I had, involves leaving the presTTTigious JD off your résumé and plugging the gap. There may be less stigma to a JD these day than when I graduated, but the palpable foolishness of making a lifelong sacrifice for a gilded, unnecessary degree speaks volumes about the deteriorating applicant pool seeking it.

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.t17.htm

Not seasonally adjustedDecember20121,131,900
October20131,131,200
November20131,129,800
December20131,130,600-1,300
Seasonally adjustedDecember20121,128,000
October20131,129,300
November20131,127,800
December20131,127,000-1,000
Change from Nov-13 to
Dec-13
-800

Saturday, December 7, 2013

November 2013

Employment fell a little in November but grew a little year-over-year. To everyone who graduated this year, happy holidays.

In an awesome bit of irony, Standard & Poor's noted

Credit quality appears to be bifurcating between small stand-alone law schools and component programs in nationally recognized universities and large state schools.
Looks like the legal education industry is about to follow the bimodal distribution trail blazed by the legal services industry and morph into winners and losers. To the losers: network. Even the winners are finding that their cash cow just died.

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.t17.htm

Not seasonally adjustedNovember20121,127,900
September20131,124,200
October20131,131,300
November20131,130,5002,600
Seasonally adjustedNovember20121,126,100
September20131,130,100
October20131,129,700
November20131,128,6002,500
Change from Oct-13 to
Nov-13
-1,100

Monday, November 25, 2013

OcTTTober 2013

Headcount dropped around 1,000 in October and is on pace to finish a hair above the previous year, if that. One individual who will not be working as a lawyer is Christopher Knorps. At least not in NY. Thanks for calling this a-hole out, Nando. Either he or someone else with lots of time on his or her hands is the reason I now moderate comments.

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.t17.htm

Not seasonally adjustedOctober20121,125,900
August20131,130,000
September20131,124,000
October20131,130,2004,300
Seasonally adjustedOctober20121,125,100
August20131,128,900
September20131,130,100
October20131,129,2004,100
Change from Sep-13 to
Oct-13
-900

Wednesday, October 23, 2013

September 2013

With a huge 6,600-position growth over the last twelve months, and almost 15K over the last three years, the legal industry is on fire!

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.t17.htm

Not seasonally adjustedSeptember20121,116,700
July20131,136,800
August20131,130,300
September20131,123,8007,100
Seasonally adjustedSeptember20121,123,700
July20131,126,100
August20131,129,200
September20131,130,3006,600
Change from Aug-13 to
Sep-13
1,100